Pepper-turkey

April 16th, 2009

Filed Under: mayonnaise, mustard, turkey with 0 Comments

Pepper-turkey

As I may have mentioned, I have a thing for pepper. But can you blame me? After all, pepper is known as “the gift of the east.” (Let’s ignore the fact that gift means ‘poison’ in Swedish.)

Anyway, this is another case of pepper spicing up an otherwise-bland cold cut. I’m trying not to reflect upon the way the pepper is evenly distributed through the uniform, textureless slices of ‘turkey’ here. I really don’t know what kind of processing it’s been through. Thankfully, it ends up being rather tasty.

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Easter Leftovers

April 13th, 2009

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beef on challah

The best part of any feast or holiday spread is raiding the fridge afterwards, and Ôstarâ’s spring festival is certainly no exception. So what we have here is a hunk of beef roast on a buttered slice of homemade challah — deliciousness through and through.

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A New Sandwich for America

January 20th, 2009

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A veritable shitload of people gathered on and around the National Mall today, to celebrate the inauguration of a new President. Some waited for hours in the bitter cold or drove from hundreds of miles away; others were lucky enough to arrive and find a place to stand fifteen minutes before the ceremonies started. People of every race, creed, and color were standing together, united in one common trait — hunger.

Seriously, though, I knew I’d be standing out there a long time. So I brought sandwiches.

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Turkeymünster

April 16th, 2008

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One of my enduring shames is the amount of food I allow to go bad. Every trip to the grocery store is full of high hopes and good intentions, but any perishables I buy often end up, well, perishing. I’ve thrown out potatoes that had more eyes than a beholder, sealed plastic bags full of a viscous goop that used to be cut salad, loaves of bread engulfed by the penicillin equivalent of Trantor—and even cold cuts well past being well past their prime.

This time, I said to myself, would be different. And it has been! Before today, I hadn’t brought lunch from home in ages. Here’s hoping this trend continues.

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Full Sandwich, Half Dome

December 30th, 2007

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“Hunger,” Benjamin Franklin is alleged to have stated, “is the best pickle.” There are a few different things that might mean — a few of the dictionary definitions for the noun pickle are: a cucumber, or other vegetable or foodstuff, preserved in brine or marinade; a liquid usually prepared with salt or vinegar for preserving or flavoring fish, meat, vegetables, etc.; Informal. a troublesome or awkward situation. So which of those makes sense? [1]

Anyway, whatever Benjamin Franklin had in mind, this much is clear: hiking four miles and 3000 vertical feet in Yosemite Valley makes you hungry. And that hunger makes an already-delicious sandwich taste even better.

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[1] Interestingly enough, all of these meanings were in use by Franklin’s time: “brine or marinade” dates from c.1440; “cucumber preserved in brine” was first recorded in 1707; and the figurative sense of “sorry plight” was first recorded in 1562.

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Black Forest

December 8th, 2007

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Black Forest Ham

In Europe, “Black Forest ham” is a protected term indicative of a particular geographical origin and method of preparation: the name is applied only to those hams from Germany’s Black Forest region that have been cured and cold smoked with a distinctive flavoring.

In the United States, on the other hand, there are no such restrictions on the use of the term—but it’s still delicious.

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Great Moments in Literature: The Red Sandwich of Courage

December 8th, 2007

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From Chapter III of Stephen Crane’s The Red Badge of Courage:

The youth had been taught that a man became another thing in battle. He saw his salvation in such a change. Hence this waiting was an ordeal to him. He was in a fever of impatience. He considered that there was denoted a lack of purpose on the part of the generals. He began to complain to the tall soldier. “I can’t stand this much longer,” he cried. “I don’t see what good it does to make us wear out our legs for nothin’.” He wished to return to camp, knowing that this affair was a blue demonstration; or else to go into a battle and discover that he had been a fool in his doubts, and was, in truth, a man of traditional courage. The strain of present circumstances he felt to be intolerable.

The philosophical tall soldier measured a sandwich of cracker and pork and swallowed it in a nonchalant manner. “Oh, I suppose we must go reconnoitering around the country jest to keep ’em from getting too close, or to develop ’em, or something.”

“Huh!” said the loud soldier.

“Well,” cried the youth, still fidgeting, “I’d rather do anything ‘most than go tramping ’round the country all day doing no good to nobody and jest tiring ourselves out.”

“So would I,” said the loud soldier. “It ain’t right. I tell you if anybody with any sense was a-runnin’ this army it—”

“Oh, shut up!” roared the tall private. “You little fool. You little damn’ cuss. You ain’t had that there coat and them pants on for six months, and yet you talk as if—”

“Well, I wanta do some fighting anyway,” interrupted the other. “I didn’t come here to walk. I could ‘ave walked to home—’round an’ ’round the barn, if I jest wanted to walk.”

The tall one, red-faced, swallowed another sandwich as if taking poison in despair.

But gradually, as he chewed, his face became again quiet and contented. He could not rage in fierce argument in the presence of such sandwiches. During his meals he always wore an air of blissful contemplation of the food he had swallowed. His spirit seemed then to be communing with the viands.

“He could not rage in fierce argument in the presence of such sandwiches.” I think that’s all that needs saying.

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Lemon-pepper chicken

December 2nd, 2007

Filed Under: provolone, toasted with 1 Comment

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Chicken cold-cuts are usually pretty bland. When I saw there was a special on “lemon-pepper” chicken, though, I dared to hope it might be flavorful, on account of the alleged lemon and pepper (have I mentioned that I really like pepper?) and whatnot. And indeed it was.

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Lox

November 27th, 2007

Filed Under: meat with 2 Comments

lox

I used to be a lox skeptic. Smoked fish in general is great, I thought, and broiled salmon is a foodstuff of unsurpassed beauty, but lox is just slimy and unpleasant, in addition to being a waste of perfectly good fish.

But that was before Mäuno gave me some lox that was homemade according to a cherished family recipe. I have been converted. In much the same way that I never really liked scotch until I tried a nice single-malt instead of a cheap blend, I was more than happy to do without lox until I had some really good stuff.

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Sandwich write-off

November 15th, 2007

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Apparently a blog named “Right Behind” recently had a sandwich-themed event:

Your mission, should you decide to accept it, is to write a manual or guide of no more than 500 and no less than 300 words describing the procedures involved in preparing a sandwich of your choice. You are to restrict your entry to the task of preparing the aforementioned sandwich from assembling the ingredients to serving the final product on a plate or other equivalent vessel.

The event’s now over with, but you can read the entries either at the link above or by clicking here, here, here, here, and here. Unfortunately I found out about this too late to enter, or even to vote, but for the record, I would have voted for the Narnia one.

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